Drugs Information Online
Drugs and diseases reference index

Drugs and diseases reference index
Search
EN

Drugs A-Z List

Diseases & Conditions A-Z List

Herbs & Supplements

Medical Dictionary

Full Article

Popular Drugs

Popular Diseases & Conditions

Drugs reference index «Immune Globulin Subcutaneous»

Immune Globulin Subcutaneous

Pronunciation: (ih-MYOON-GLAH-byoo-lin subcutaneous)Class: Immune globulin

Trade Names:Vivaglobin- Injection 160 mg/mL

Pharmacology

Replaces normal human IgG antibodies.

Pharmacokinetics

Absorption

Bioavailability of immune globulin (IG) subcutaneous is approximately 73% compared with IG intravenous (IGIV). Peak serum IgG levels are lower with subcutaneous compared with IV administration. Mean peak and trough IgG levels following subcutaneous administration are 1,163 and 1,064 mg/dL, respectively.

Distribution

Steady-state serum IgG levels are relatively stable with weekly subcutaneous administration.

Elimination

Mean t ½ is at least 21 days.

Indications and Usage

Treatment of primary immune deficiency.

Contraindications

History of anaphylactic or severe systemic response to IG preparations; patients with selective immunoglobulin A (IgA) deficiency who have known antibody against IgA.

Dosage and Administration

Adults and Children 2 yr of age and older

Subcutaneous Recommended weekly dose is 100 to 200 mg/kg body weight. Calculate the initial weekly dose by multiplying the previous IGIV dose by 1.37 then divide this dose into weekly doses based on the previous IGIV treatment interval. Doses may be adjusted over time to achieve the desired clinical response and serum IgG levels.

General Advice

  • For subcutaneous administration only. Do not inject intravenously or into a blood vessel.
  • Inject into abdomen, thigh, upper arm, and/or lateral hip.
  • Prior to use, allow solution to reach ambient room temperature.
  • Do not shake.
  • Do not administer if particulate matter or cloudiness noted.
  • Divide doses larger than 15 mL into several muscle sites to reduce local pain and discomfort.
  • Do not mix with other medicinal products.

Storage/Stability

Store in refrigerator (36° to 46°F). Do not freeze.

Drug Interactions

Live vaccines (eg, measles, mumps, rubella)

Efficacy of live attenuated virus vaccines may be transiently impaired.

Laboratory Test Interactions

Passive transmission of antibodies to erythrocyte antigens (eg, A, B, D) may cause a positive direct or indirect antiglobulin test.

Adverse Reactions

Cardiovascular

Tachycardia (3%).

CNS

Headache (48%); asthenia (5%).

Dermatologic

Rash (17%); skin disorder (3%); mild or moderate swelling, redness, and itching.

EENT

Sore throat (17%).

GI

GI disorder (37%); nausea (11%); diarrhea (10%).

Genitourinary

Urine abnormality (3%).

Respiratory

Increased cough (10%).

Miscellaneous

Fever (25%); allergic reaction (11%); pain (10%).

Precautions

Pregnancy

Category C .

Lactation

Undetermined.

Children

Safety and efficacy not established in children younger than 2 yr of age.

Elderly

Undetermined.

Hypersensitivity

Hypersensitivity, including anaphylactic reactions may occur.

Special Risk Patients

Patients receiving IG therapy for the first time, switching from another brand of IG, or who have not received IG within the preceding 8 wk may be at risk for developing reactions including chills, fever, nausea, vomiting, and rarely shock.

Blood-borne virus transmission

IG subcutaneous is made from human blood and may carry a risk of transmitting infectious agents (eg, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, viruses).

Overdosage

Symptoms

No data available.

Patient Information

  • Provide home treatment patients with instructions on subcutaneous infusion, including type of equipment and its maintenance, proper infusion techniques, selection of appropriate sites, maintenance of treatment diary, and measures to take if adverse reactions occur.

Copyright © 2009 Wolters Kluwer Health.

  • Vivaglobin Prescribing Information (FDA)
  • Vivaglobin Detailed Consumer Information (PDR)
  • Vivaglobin Consumer Overview

Comment «Immune Globulin Subcutaneous»