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Drugs reference index «beractant»

beractant

Generic Name: beractant (ber AK tant)Brand Names: Survanta Intratracheal

What is beractant?

Beractant is made from animal lung extract and contains fatty acids and proteins. It works by reducing the surface tension of fluids inside the human lung to keep the lung from collapsing.

Beractant is used to treat or prevent respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in newborn infants.

Beractant may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about beractant?

Beractant is given within minutes or hours after the infant is born. The medication must be given in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), a specialized setting for premature babies or newborns who need special care.

Your child will require special care in the hospital during treatment with beractant. Talk with your doctor about any special instructions for handling the infant and watching for side effects while beractant is given.

Follow your doctor's instructions about any restrictions on feeding or other medications after your child has been treated with beractant.

What should I discuss with my health care provider before my child receives beractant?

Your child will require special care in the hospital during treatment for RDS. Talk with your doctor about any special instructions for handling the infant and watching for side effects while beractant is given.

How is beractant given?

Beractant is given within minutes or hours after the infant is born. The medication must be given in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), a specialized setting for premature babies or newborns who need special care.

This medication is given through an endotracheal (en-doe-TRAY-kee-al) tube. This is a flexible plastic tube placed in the infant's mouth and passed down into the airway. A doctor will insert the tube using a scope to see the inside of the airway while guiding the tube into place.

Beractant is usually given every 6 hours.

To make sure this medication is helping your child's condition and is not causing any harmful effects, your child's lung function will need to be tested often. This will help your doctor determine how long to continue treatment with beractant. Your child may also need blood tests.

What happens if my child misses a dose?

Since beractant is given by healthcare professionals in a hospital setting, it is not likely that your child will miss a dose.

What happens if my child receives an overdose?

Overdose with beractant has not been reported. Because this medication is given by a healthcare professional, it is not likely that your child will receive an overdose.

What should be avoided after my child receives beractant?

Follow your doctor's instructions about any restrictions on feeding or other medications after your child has been treated with beractant.

Beractant side effects

Get emergency medical help if your child has any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of the face, lips, tongue, or throat. Tell your child's caregivers at once if the child has any of these serious side effects:
  • pale skin;

  • slow heartbeat;

  • breathing that stops;

  • urinating less than usual; or

  • blood in the urine.

Less serious side effects include:

  • noisy breathing;

  • feeding or bowel problems; or

  • bleeding around the endotracheal tube.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Beractant Dosing Information

Usual Pediatric Dose for Respiratory Distress Syndrome:

<48 hours of life: 4 mL/kg instilled intratracheally no more often than every 6 hours for a total of up to 4 doses. For prevention of respiratory distress syndrome in premature infants with birth weights of less than 1750 g and more than 600 g, the first dose is preferably given within 15 minutes of birth. For rescue treatment, the first dose is given as soon as possible, preferably within 8 hours of birth.>48 hours of life: Safety and efficacy have not been established.

What other drugs will affect beractant?

There may be other drugs that can interact with beractant. However, your child's care providers will be aware of all medications used in your child's treatment. It is not likely that your child will be given other medications that will interact with beractant.

Where can I get more information?

  • Your doctor or pharmacist can provide more information about beractant.
  • Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.
Copyright 1996-2006 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 1.04. Revision Date: 11/19/2009 8:58:06 AM.
  • Beractant Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer)

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