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Drugs reference index «Bleph-10»

Bleph-10

Generic name: Sulfacetamide sodiumBrand names: Bleph-10

Why is Bleph-10 prescribed?

Bleph-10 is used in the treatment of eye inflammations, corneal ulcer, and other eye infections. It may be used along with an oral sulfa drug to treat a serious eye infection called trachoma.

Most important fact about Bleph-10

Bleph-10 is similar to oral sulfa drugs such as the antibiotic sulfamethoxazole. If you are allergic to sulfa drugs, you may also be allergic to Bleph-10. In addition, if you have taken one of these medications in the past, you may have developed a "hidden" allergy to sulfa drugs that might show up when you take Bleph-10. Be alert for a rash, itching, or other signs of allergy. If any of these symptoms develop, stop taking Bleph-10 immediately and consult your doctor.

How should you take Bleph-10?

Bleph-10 is available in eyedrop form. Use it exactly as prescribed. To apply Bleph-10, pull down your lower eyelid to form a pouch, then squeeze in the medication. To avoid contaminating the eye drops, do not touch your eye with the dropper bottle. Keep the dropper bottle poised slightly above your eye as you instill the drops.

  • If you miss a dose...Apply it as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the one you missed and go back to your regular schedule.
  • Storage instructions...Store at room temperature.

What side effects may occur?

Side effects cannot be anticipated. If any develop or change in intensity, inform your doctor as soon as possible. Only your doctor can determine if it is safe for you to continue taking Bleph-10.

Bleph-10 may irritate your eye, causing stinging and burning. The irritation usually lasts only a short time. If it is very painful or lasts for a long time, you may have to stop using the medication.

In rare cases, people using Bleph-10 have developed a severe blistering skin rash. Be alert for skin reactions. If a rash appears, stop using Bleph-10 and call your doctor.

Why should Bleph-10 not be prescribed?

Do not use Bleph-10 if you have ever had an allergic reaction to (or are sensitive to) Bleph-10 or any other sulfa drug.

Special warnings about Bleph-10

Stay in close touch with your doctor while using Bleph-10. If you have a pus-producing eye infection, the pus may inactivate Bleph-10. Since sulfa drugs do not kill fungi, it is possible to develop a fungus infection in your eye while using Bleph-10.

Possible food and drug interactions when taking Bleph-10

Bleph-10 should not be used with medications containing silver. Check with your doctor if you are unsure of any medications you are taking.

Special information if you are pregnant or breastfeeding

If you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant, inform your doctor immediately. There is no information about the safety of Bleph-10 during pregnancy.

It is not known whether Bleph-10 appears in breast milk. If Bleph-10 is essential to your health, it may be necessary to stop breastfeeding during treatment.

Recommended dosage for Bleph-10

Inflamed Eyes or Corneal Ulcer

Place 1 or 2 drops inside the lower eyelid every 2 or 3 hours during the day, less often at night.

Trachoma (Contagious Inflammation)

Use 2 drops every 2 hours.

Overdosage

Although no specific information is available on overdose with Bleph-10, any medication used in excess can have serious consequences. If you suspect you may have used too much of Bleph-10, seek medical attention immediately.

  • Bleph-10 Drops MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer)
  • Bleph-10 Concise Consumer Information (Cerner Multum)
  • Bleph-10 Prescribing Information (FDA)
  • Isopto Cetamide Prescribing Information (FDA)

See Also...

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